Finding Home – Guest Post

Join us for this tour from August 3 to August 21, 2020!Book Details:

Book Title:  FINDING HOME by Corinne Joy Brown and Ginny McDonald
Category:  Middle-Grade Fiction (Ages 8-12),  130 pages
Genre: General Fiction
Publisher:  Loose Cayuse Productions
Release date:   June 2019
Content Rating:  G. There are no expletives, sex scenes or bad language anywhere.

“Born in the flatlands of Rock Springs, Wyoming, newborn mustang Pahaska
tells the heart-wrenching story of her separation from her mother and
the wild horse herd she was born into. Captured by strangers, her entire
world has disintegrated. Penned in the filthy, manure-filled confines
of a horse hauler’s trailer, her life is changed forever. Finding Home, a
2020 Spur Finalist for Juvenile Fiction, is a brilliantly written story
about the adoption of the mustang “Curly Girl” by a teen who has always
dreamed of having her own horse. Ginny McDonald’s illustrations convey
fine detail and emotion in the images of the horses, bringing each one
to life. This heart-warming tale will appeal to those with a love for
animals.” – Joni Franks, RoundUp Magazine, Western Writers of America“This beautifully written and illustrated book will appeal to any animal
loving young reader. Differences (equine and otherwise) are applauded,
working through complicated human relationships, a philosophical, well
balanced approach to difficult issues (wild horse roundups), and
positive animal training techniques are included in this educational,
riveting new book!” – Nancy Sachs, Director Platte Valley Pony Club“To see the world through the eyes of a newborn filly as she grows into
adulthood, or an excited young girl in search of her first horse, is a
treasure found in Corinne Joy Brown’s novel Finding Home, a
story of loss and recovery told in a brilliant way. The illustrations by
Ginny McDonald help to refine the wonderful writing which places the
reader squarely in the experience of Curly Girl and Jesse, her adopter. Finding Home
is a wonderful story for our time, in consideration of the wild horses
whose freedom is threatened across the West and the people who adopt the
captured ones into loving homes.” – James A. Holmes CEO and Executive Director, Cherokee Ranch and Castle Foundation

Book Description:

For every girl or boy who owns a horse, or wished they did, Finding
Home
brings all the drama and beauty of America’s wild horses to the
middle-grade reader.A coming-of-age story and a tale about friendship, trust and
understanding, both horse and owner have powerful lessons to learn.
Together, young Jesse Nolan from Colorado and her wild mustang, Curly
Girl, rounded up in Wyoming, discover what it means to rely on oneself,
as well as those who love you most.

Buy the Book:
Finding Home
Amazon ~ B&N
Meet the Authors:

Ginny McDonald is an award-winning, professional Colorado
illustrator and a longtime advocate for wild horses. She is the adopter
of an American Curly mare, and more recently, a second mustang named
“Lil Bit”. Ginny’s skill in the use of Prismacolor pencils brings this
story to life with rich detail and heartfelt emotion.

 Guest Post

Horses and Humans
Even as an adult, I marvel at the relationship between humans and horses. An Italian psychologist once researched why our two species work so well together. She believed it’s due in part to humans whose logical mind has evolved to a place where everything is intellectualized, merging with an animal whose brain is deeply instinctual, relying on fight or flight responses. Put the two together and you have a rare combination of trust and faith — that somehow, each will do the other right. It’s why we have Grand Prix level show horses willing to jump over 10 foot-high fences or savvy trail horses willing to wend their way across sandy creeks with unsure footing. Where knowledge fails, instinct takes over. Where instinct fails, man leads, reassuring the animal that all is well.
Each species processes the world in another way and are the better for it. I know in my own life, riding horses as a child gave me a kind of confidence I couldn’t have achieved any other way. No fancy lessons, just years of riding miles of trails, mostly without the supervision of adults. It’s hard for me to imagine allowing anybody’s children today to do the same. But that independence was a rich part of my past and I treasure every memory. It might be why two of my three, best-selling novels (“MacGregor’s Lantern” and “Sanctuary Ranch”) include horses, and both my children’s books (“Wishful Watoosi” and “Finding Home”) are also about them.
I’m not the only one fascinated by the connection. For example, the “Horses and Humans Research Foundation” has attempted to create a scientific basis for research on this topic. In their own words, “Through sustained investment in rigorous research, the Foundation serves as a catalyst to advance global knowledge of horse-human interactions and their impact on health and wellness. Their goals are to support, promote and fund scientific research that explores the claimed, yet unsubstantiated benefits of equine-assisted activities and therapies, leading to the discovery of the most effective methods and techniques for conducting thousands of existing and future programs. Another goal is to educate the public (including parents, donors, insurance companies and physicians) on research findings so that equine-assisted activities become more accessible to those in need.”
What they don’t detail here is how great the gains are for children with developmental disabilities when placed into handicapped-riding programs, or how impressive the growth in motor skills and empathy of any child who masters riding at an early age. Caring and respect for animals, plus improved rhythm and balance are just two of the obvious rewards. Adults benefit too, no matter when they discover horseback riding. Horses require complete honesty and staying focused, a kind of soul work at the equine level. For anyone who reads my novels, and I hope they will, my stories take the reader deep into other worlds, to other times and places, and often, to memorable horses as well.
Denver native Corinne Joy Brown is a multi-published,
award-winning Colorado author, magazine editor and freelance writer
focused on the West .” Recent publications include “Young Rider”,
“Cowboys & Indians,” and “Working Ranch.” She’s also been a horse
owner most of her life. Corinne is committed to teaching the next
generation about the power of horses to teach and heal. “Finding Home”
is her eighth book.Connect with the author: Website ~ Facebook 
 
Tour Schedule:Aug 3 – Locks, Hooks and Books – book review / giveaway
Aug 3 – Corinne Rodrigues | Booksnista – book spotlight / giveaway
Aug 4 – fundinmental – book spotlight / giveaway
Aug 4 – Splashes of Joy – book review / guest post / author interview / giveaway
Aug 5 – Rockin’ Book Reviews – book review / guest post / giveaway
Aug 5 – My Journey Back – book review / author interview / giveaway
Aug 6 – I’d Rather Be At The Beach – book review
Aug 7 –T’s Stuff – book spotlight / author interview / giveaway
Aug 7 – Books for Books – book spotlight
Aug 10 – Reading Authors Nework – book review / giveaway
Aug 11 – Jazzy Book Reviews – book spotlight / author interview / giveaway
Aug 11 – Priya’s Lit Blog – book review / giveaway
Aug 12 – Older & Smarter? – book review
Aug 12 – Read and Review – book spotlight / guest post / giveaway
Aug 13 – A Mama’s Corner Of the World – book review / giveaway
Aug 13 – Stephanie Jane – book spotlight / giveaway
Aug 14 – Rosepoint Publishing – book review / giveaway
Aug 14 – Writer with Wanderlust – book review / guest post / giveaway
Aug 17 – authors.ace – book review
Aug 18 – Bound 4 Escape – book review / giveaway
Aug 18 – Sefina Hawke’s Books – book spotlight
Aug 19 – Krisha’s Cozy Corner – book review / guest post / giveaway
Aug 19 – Library of Clean Reads – book review / giveaway
Aug 20 – My Reading Journey – book review / guest post / giveaway
Aug 20 – Pen Possessed – book review / giveaway
Aug 21 – Svetlanas reads and views – book review

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